Hope welcomes two new advisory board members for 2020!

Today Loree D. Jones and Nicole Lynn Lewis join the Hope Center’s Advisory Board, strengthening our commitment to the Philadelphia region and expanding our capacity to advancing evidence-based supports for #RealCollege students with children. 

Loree is chief of staff for the chancellor of Rutgers University–Camden, host of #RealCollege2020. She has served in top leadership positions in nonprofits, higher education, and government, including as managing director, and chief operating officer, of the City of Philadelphia, and as executive director of the African Studies Association, an organization of scholars and professionals with an interest in Africa hosted by Rutgers University. 

A graduate of Spelman College and Princeton University, Loree has been recognized for her dedication to public service and commitment to diversity. She also serves on the boards of Health Partners Plans, the Philadelphia Health Partnership, the Independence Foundation, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society and the World Affairs Council. She is a former board member of a wide range of civic organizations, including the Project HOME, Committee of Seventy, the Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board, the Philadelphia Planning Commission, and the African American Museum of Philadelphia.  She is an alumna – and serving for the second time as co-president – of Operation Understanding, a cross-cultural program founded in Philadelphia more than 30 years ago to build bridges of understanding between the African American and Jewish communities.

Nicole is Chief Executive Officer of Generation Hope, an organization which she founded in March 2010. Generation Hope is the only community-based nonprofit organization in the Washington D.C. region focused on college completion and early childhood success for teen parents. Nicole was named a 2014 CNN Hero and Generation Hope has been recognized by The Washington Post, “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,”  “The Steve Harvey Show”, and Good Morning America for its innovative work.  Nicole founded Generation Hope because after completing college as a teen mother despite tremendous obstacles, she wanted to help other teen parents earn their college degrees and achieve stable and successful futures. She named the organization Generation Hope because in her own words, “Hope is the number one, necessary, secret ingredient to anyone’s success.”

A graduate of George Mason University and the College of William and Mary, Nicole was named the 2013 Distinguished Alumna by George Mason University’s School of Public Policy for her innovative work with youth through the founding of Generation Hope and was elected to the William & Mary Alumni Association Board of Directors in that same year.  Also in 2013, she was selected and inducted into the National Leadership Honor Society, Omicron Delta Kappa.  In 2014, Nicole was named a “Champion of Change” in honor of American Graduate Day by PBS.  She is also a two-time TEDx speaker and in 2017 was named a top Minority Business Leader by the Washington Business Journal and top “40 Under 40” by Washingtonian Magazine.